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Current ThreatCon for CONUS

Current ThreatCon for CONUS
Current ThreatCon for CONUS

Thursday, March 24, 2016

Would you vote for this guy today?


Given the corrupted state of the electoral system we have today, when most people feel disgusted pulling the lever for the candidates that are able to become nominees - if a genuine Constitutionalist such as Thomas Jefferson were on the ballot, would you set aside your outrage and go vote for him?

Let's not get into the weeds about how he could never even get on a ballot today.  Let's not pick nits about the Louisiana Purchase and 'Constitutionality' of his decision to move forward - let's just stick to the rhetorical: Would you vote for Jefferson today if you had the chance?

6 comments:

  1. I would vote for him in a heartbeat.

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  2. If we believe in God's Justice, then it's painfully simple - we are *obliged* to choose that which is good over that which is not. And we are *obliged* to choose that which is best, even over that which is "good".

    So - not setting his errors aside, but acknowledging them along with the good which he has done: I would be obliged to vote for, and to go out and campaign for him as a candidate, if in all reasonable Judgement he was the BEST candidate, even compared to any other "good" candidate who might be presented.

    Yet nowhere in any of this am I obliged to vote for, support, or in any way lend credence to the "lesser", or even the "least" among many evils; whether such support or credence be in an election, or in any other aspect of life.

    And every man who shall avoid or deny his obligations shall, in all righteousness, be Judged thereupon; and every man who speaks evil shall be reckoned as evil, just as every man who speaks for the good gives every cause to be contemplated as good - for what comes out of a man is the essence of him.

    And he who speaks lies is incapable of recognizing the Truth, just as he who speaks of only small things is incapable of apprehending great things.

    Shall evil lay alongside goodness, and yet there be peace between them? I tell you that it cannot, for evil shall ever contest against the good, until all goodness shall have been consumed or driven away, and only evil shall remain. But rather that which is good has the duty to dispose of that which is evil, forthwith; neither to tolerate evil upon such excuses as may wont to be given in its defense, for evil is ever possessed of a multitude of excuses, the ends of which are beyond all reason and sanity, even before they are spoken.

    For all evil is but a seed, out of which true wickedness awaits to spring - it requires only illicit tolerance and our abandoning of our Just Duty, to grow into total victory, over whatever goodness may have existed around it.


    WE HAVE BEEN WARNED

    ReplyDelete
  3. Mmm... interesting question. If one bases their decision strictly on hagiography, of course. But spend a little time in the history books, then one might become a more informed voter.

    Jefferson was a reluctant leader. During the first couple years of the Revolution, he was at Monticello doing some remodeling, picking out tile, looking at swatches for drapes and such. Totally detached. As governor of Virginia, a case can be made that he was rather indecisive when faced with the British raiding parties on the Virginia coast. He, as well as all the anti-federalists declined to engage immediately to oppose the machinations of Hamilton until it was almost too late. His election as president was a contested affair and there is little doubt that a deal was struck to keep the central bank intact in exchange for the crucial votes in Congress for him to assume office.

    Jefferson a leader? No doubt he was brilliant. Not much of orator. He had a rather effeminate voice. He was a consummate writer but his most notable work, the Declaration of Independence, bears a striking resemblance to a sermon delivered by a Puritan pastor before the opening of the royal Massachusetts assembly right before the war. And truth be known, he was probably a little nerdy.

    While there is no doubt that Jefferson became president in a rather tumultuous time and did rather well, I'm not so sure he would be the guy for the moment.

    Just sayin'. :-)

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  4. "And every man who shall avoid or deny his obligations shall, in all righteousness, be Judged thereupon; and every man who speaks evil shall be reckoned as evil, just as every man who speaks for the good gives every cause to be contemplated as good - for what comes out of a man is the essence of him. 

    And he who speaks lies is incapable of recognizing the Truth, just as he who speaks of only small things is incapable of apprehending great things."
    Amen, LT. Well said, brother

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    Replies
    1. Fear of the LORD is the beginning of wisdom;
      and knowledge of The Holy One is proof of understanding.

      He has offered us an inherritance which is trustworthy; and the work of His hands are Truth and Justice, forever.

      What else could I then do, but attest to the Truth, to rise up in song and proclaim Great and wonderful are Thy works, O Lord God Almighty; just and true are Thy ways, O King of ages.

      Who shall not fear Thee, O Lord, and magnify Thy holy name? For Thou alone art holy: all nations shall come, and shall adore in Thy sight, because Thy judgments are manifest upon them.

      Here indeed is that time when the words of wisdom shall be as goads, even as nails sunk deep into them; and the counsel of many leaders shall come forth from one shepard; more than this demand not, neither expend thyself endlessly gathering words into books, lest an excess of study become an affliction of the flesh. But let us all hear as one gathering the summation of everything - fear God and keep His commandments, for this is the whole duty of mankind; and God shall judge everything which is done, whether it be good or evil.

      WE HAVE BEEN WARNED




      Delete

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