Enemies of Liberty are ruthless. To own your Liberty, you'd better come harder than your enemies..

Enemies of Liberty are ruthless.  To own your Liberty, you'd better come harder than your enemies..
**TO ALL .GOV WATCHING MY LIFE** You already know I am playing by all the rules. If you want to talk to me, just call or knock on the door. I'll meet you at your place, or invite you into mine. But there is no need to shoot my dogs or frighten my wife. Just so you know. ~ Kerodin

III Citadel Project



We have decided to build a firearms company as an industry around which to build a haven for Liberty: The Citadel.

There is a lot of distance between now and then (Like how I mixed Time and Space there?). Much can happen, and failure is free while success will cost us all.

I see a walled town, much like many small planned communities around the country today. Our Citadel will have a retail town center, restaurants, dress shops, bakeries, and any other type of retail you'll find in Anywhere USA.

I see parks, walking/running/bicycle trails. I see a small commercial office/industrial part of town. I see large swaths of pines and open areas to ensure we do not ever feel cramped.

I see a bastion for Liberty and Free Enterprise, where every single one of you will have the opportunity to begin any company you have ever dreamed of owning.

High along the rear wall of the Citadel, I see the III Arms Company factory, standing Sentinel over the town of Patriots below.  I see strong, fortified and well-designed residential for at least 3000 households. Condos, maybe townhomes, and single family homes of various sizes.

All of this will be behind the protection of a genuine curtain wall, circling the town and taking full advantage of topography and footprint for housing. Beyond the walls will be more Citadel property with more homes, orchards, eventually giving way to the private propery of ranchers and farmers.

Should the need arise, our people come into town and we close the gates, and we enjoy our safety and our preps, our electricity and sanitation.

When the gate is open, tourism is but one stream of revenue available for those who call the Citadel home. Our preferred location is home to big skiing, hunting, world-class fishing and more.

And the one thing you will never find: A Marxist Resident of the Citadel.

Dare to imagine going through every day of your life, from morning coffee to your business day, to teacher conferences, and not having to endure one single Collectivist, and never having them anywhere near your children.

And the cherry on top: The Citadel will attract Patriotic Americans. Your neighbors will naturally be the kind of Americans you want at your shoulder and covering your back.

A small, high quality firearm manufacturing facility (with complementary ammo sideline) turning out III Branded utilitarian firearms is our baseline requirement. Once we have that support infrastructure, you can expect this project to move quickly and get this turned into reality, where Patriotic folks can come, have a place to live in as much Liberty and Freedom as possible while having a reliable, satisfying job/career for security.

We will start with a simple industry town.

Where we go is up to us.

Links to conversations about the Project:

March 7, 2012
March 16, 2016
July 18,2012
July 19, 2012: Kodiak
July 22, 2012: Citadel Concept
July 22, 2012: A Fair Qustion
July 23, 2012: What threats do you expect?
III Pioneer Project: Idaho
July 23: Revenue Streams
III Pioneer Project: Acreage
July 30, 2012: What do you think when you think "Citadel"?
August 3: God's Pistol

Kerodin
III

58 comments:

  1. K, think logistic and while Wyoming is a fine state and the people are nice I think Idaho offers a better balance overall.
    1.Better defensive borders, Mountains, Canyons, deserts and rivers.
    2. An Inland port to the Pacific
    3. CCI Blazer already has a shop in Lewiston
    4. Varied agriculture,timber and mining.
    5. Plenty of hydro power via dams as well as geothermal and solar should be viable at least in the south.
    6. A milder climate compared to Wyoming.
    7. More rivers and run off compared to Wyoming.
    8. Defense in depth as any major push would have to go through WY. UT. MT. WA. OR. and Nevada through rough terrain and people.
    9. Idaho's weak point is oil/gas and WY. has us beat by a lot for oil.
    10. High religious/conservative/libertarian population that practices preparedness. While I may not care for Mormon religious doctrine they are very prepared compared to the general population. Overall Idaho has a very live and let live kind of folks here.
    11. Low population 1.5 million in the whole state according to the census. But I'd locate around Lewiston/Orofino area rather than south Idaho.

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  2. Thanks BG! I can't wait to hear what people have to say about this. We're still unsettled as to where we're going to light and set...so you never know.
    Miss Violet

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  3. Ill be the first one there. I am itching to do something hands on to help the community. I'm not a genius writer/fighter by any means. But I make a good ground troop. =) Let me know when I can start kicking in and secure myself a bunk.

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  4. I'll offer up my firearm smithing and coating application skills, my 30yrs of fixing shiite for money (industrial maintenance/repair/electrician) abilities. And if we go to quality handloading of ammo, my near 40yrs of pulling a handle on a press. Oh, and my charming personality is just a bonus!

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  5. Idaho has the additional benefit of a border with a foreign nation. However, Canada has the "Finlandization" problem that they have to accommodate a powerful neighbor, so that may not be a major factor. I have to admit I do like the idea of a somewhat milder climate than Wyoming offers.

    A property in Wyoming that had a natural gas well, or wells, could possibly supply enough energy for the community to be energy independent. Heat, electricity and auto fuel supplied locally could be a significant factor. Energy independence could make the difference in long term survival.

    Check out the Global Village Construction Set at http://opensourceecology.org/index.php for some interesting tools that might be relevant to the Pioneer Project. These tools are literally designed to build a village. The ability to make many of our own construction/production tools could provide a way to bootstrap this project. Producing these tools for others after we made them for ourselves could also be another source of income. The compressed earth block machine alone could make the difference in being able to start building. Technology is rapidly making local self sufficiency a real possibility.

    Building a village from scratch is a very exciting idea. There are so many possibilities. A walled village could be overtly "decorative", supposedly done for style, while providing significant security advantages.

    I'm sure there are a significant number of people out there who would enthusiastically embrace this idea. Some, like me, would be willing to move onto a bare piece of ground and start laying the foundation, figuratively and literally.

    Is there a lower and/or upper limit on the population that would work for this village? What size, in acres, would be workable?

    The whole place needs to be private property. That would exclude at least some of the government meddling that comes with "public" property. Maybe a co-op to own what would typically be public property, with membership in the co-op being a requirement for use of the property. The co-op could also own things like major construction equipment. Maybe it could also run an internal "currency" of some sort - hours of labor, grams of gold, whatever and provide the functions typically done by government, but run as a business. It might be possible to develop a sophisticated internal economy with most of the community needs provided locally. Keep everything strictly legal, but exclude outside government control whenever possible.

    This type of place would hopefully have a broad enough appeal to attract professionals (like a doctor and dentist) and skilled trades people. The actual arms company could be very small with individuals being independent contractors providing parts and services. Keep everything distributed and decentralized to make it less vulnerable to antagonistic government actions.

    Have a genuine constitutional militia with proper training and organization.

    Fiber optic cable for a secure local comm net.

    Private school with local volunteers to help out. I've read to a class of 5th grade students and it was very rewarding.

    This just barely scratches the surface of the possibilities. And, to be clear, I'm not saying any of these things are the best way to go. Just tossing out ideas to get the ball rolling.

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    1. Oh yeah, this is going to be interesting!
      Miss Violet

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    2. "A property in Wyoming that had a natural gas well, or wells, could possibly supply enough energy for the community to be energy independent. Heat, electricity and auto fuel supplied locally could be a significant factor. Energy independence could make the difference in long term survival."

      Something I thought of, when we lived in Wyo, maybe it's changed, but I doublt it, very few properties came with mineral/oil/gas rights. They are all pretty well tied up already. Maybe TL would know more about that as he's working in that field.

      Miss Violet

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  6. I'd like to more take over a town, remake it in the III image, than make a new one.
    You start putting up walls, segregating yourselves behind closed doors you'll be labled with separatist, supremacist faster than you can deny it. This is a 10-20yr plan, not a dig a hole, start shooting tresspassers for looking your way.

    Find a place, start moving there, start 'voting' yourselves into positions of 'authority', council positions, business planning seats. Make yourselves visible in the existing community, start making a difference in how things are run.

    Be the 'good' neighbor who just happens to work at the gun plant and carries a gun. Help little old ladies across the street, help disappear the local thugs, volunteer to help little Johnnie or Jane with Scouts, afterschool activities, assist the local 'good' be commonplace with your daily activities. The bad guys will see that it's not the place they want to be, maybe with a little assistance with some folks, and move them out as we move more of us in.

    It'll never be Mayberry, but that was a mostly ideal setting, and I'd be digging my foundation footers tomorrow if it existed.

    Imagine greeting your neighbors in the morning, "Hey, I heard you got the new IIIx9 in 9x19....how's that working out for you? Have you tried the new III Showstopper rounds for it? 147gr, 1897fps and real tack driver in that IIIx9! You might want to come by the factory later today, they're having a demonstration and hands on for the improved Triple I-14, kind of a public input session. It's all new, .333 Patriot, integrally suppressed, integrally counterbalanced, fully automatic. We'll be poking holes in that armored DHS vehicle that 'showed up' on the range last week last week. Yup, you heard right, no recoil. Zero. Junior there can hit the target 99 out of 99 times on full auto if HE holds still. See you there? Great! Have a good day!"

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    1. Wow, Millerized, you should be a travel agent, I want to go there, NOW!
      Miss Violet
      PS How're feeling, hope you're up and about.

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    2. I was only 'down' for about 3 days total. The rest was a working 'vacation'. But, we're 99.9% and climbing. As soon as the Ka-bar is back from the sharpeners, we'll be 100%.

      Jane Heller, the recipient, is pushing the 100% herself. Seems God was up to his elbow's in this whole process.

      And I'm no travel agent, but I did stay in a Holiday Inn in 2001.

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    3. "And I'm no travel agent, but I did stay in a Holiday Inn in 2001".....
      LMBO! Now that was pretty dang funny!
      Thanks for the laugh!

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  7. The BG Family is doing what we can to stay in So Cal because of our large extended family in the area... but we understand that we are on a sinking ship. The III Pioneer community is on our radar should we choose to move.

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  8. I'll have to think about Kodiak. The husband and I always did want to go to Alaska and have always regretted not going. It does concern me about the growing season though. I love seafood, but veggies are pretty tasty too. The climate wouldn't be very condusive to livestock, I'm guessing? Is it big enough for a III population explosion? As far as "culture goes" if I have a book I'm happy.
    Miss Violet

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    1. I haven't spent much time around Kodiak, only passing through a few times but I did spend a few years wandering the rest of the state.

      I love Juneau but the whole town is perched at the base of a very steep mountain. Yeah, there is some flat land around and you could raise a garden. Few people do.

      Fairbanks is known for the cold winters, sometimes 60 degrees below zero! Less well know in the fact that summers sometimes bring temps in the 80's (above zero). Still, while the surface ground is soft enough to till, 15 or 20 feet down is permafrost that keeps the ground above it pretty cool. Not real good for planting.

      The Palmer-Matanuska Valley area is the place to grow stuff. Unfortunately that area is close to Anchorage and is growing about as fast as any other suburban area.

      The longer days cause veggies to grow to ridiculous sizes. I once grew a 14 pound turnip by accident and 100 pound cabbages are not uncommon! Strawberries go crazy and raspberries grow wild.

      King salmon could be taken from roadside ditches and moose are pests. Cattle ranches do quite well and there's a decent herd of American Bison a few hundred miles northeast of Palmer.

      Yeah, I'd go back if I could. But I'm too old. Some of you younger guys should do it though.

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  9. Juneau would be a better choice than Kodiak; closer to the 48 but still adequately isolated, more stores, better weather year round which means a better growing season, more room for expansion of population, a smaller population of bears, the fishing is just as good.

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  10. My brother told me Kodiak is kinda in a storm route, and has lots of bears, a canning factory, a Philipino church ( a lot of Philipinos work in the canning factories and the processing ships.
    No, I have nothing against Philipinos, just telling you what he said. No, he has nothing against Philipinos. He married a Philipina.
    Miss Violet

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  11. I would go to the sahara with this group. And die somewhat less miserably than if I went alone. =) Kerodin, anything I can do to help let me know.

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  12. Speaking of the Sahara, water is a serious concern. Access to water and long term prospects for water would be a major consideration in someplace like Wyoming. Idaho would have an advantage in that area, I think.

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  13. That being said, I also would live just about anywhere to be a part of this group.

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  14. You make a good point, millerized. Even moving into an existing community we would have to go out of our way not to be seen as invaders. Your suggestions on how to behave are spot on. Adhering to our belief in "Rightful Liberty" and really living it would be essential.

    OTOH, Kerodin's idea of building a walled village is SO appealing and designing it from the ground up would be my idea of fun. Have to keep both approaches in mind and do what makes the most sense when the time comes.

    I agree with Miss Violet - great ideas and thoughts.

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  15. Anything you cannot grow yourself food wise has to be gotten somewhere. Short growing season, even with hothouse/greenhouse assistance will require a major money operation, and still not likely to grow the variety to get a large group through 6-8+ months of a non-growing season. And if we're forced to truck it in, being a bit closer to the source, or A source is a must.

    With a SHTF, even a partial collapse scenario, or just someone not wanting us to have what we need, we cannot rely on getting anything we didn't grow ourselves, or bring with us in the first place. I like you folks, but long pig just isn't on my menu....yet.

    48 state based operations, a moderate, if not temperate climate will be required if we are to be completely autonomous. Yes, it can be done in the arctic, but it has to be done perfectly or folks go hungry.

    This is why integrating with an existing community and infrastructure, then (re)building it 'our' way from the inside out is one of the better ways to accomplish our goal. Why reinvent the wheel? Fine tune it, make it roll our way, add our preferred tire, but use what's already there to further our cause.

    Of course, this is just my opinion, and I was wrong once before.

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  16. I was telling my brother about this concept. The first thing out of his mounth was: "The Dems won't let you get away with a community like that, I don't care where you are." I thought it was interesting, he is conservative. I told him, that if that was the case, I'm sure the Republicans would be right in there with the Dems, because we would be a threat to them too.
    Miss V

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    1. I think your brother has a very valid point, which is why it will be important to "play by the rules" in the neginning until we become enough of an economic and political force to push our weight around a bit.

      In a low-population state, with good food and water resources, removed from the hordes but accessable by truckers, we could establish a firearms factory according to all of the rules and build a community around the economic power of the factory.

      This could also blend with Millerized's concept of moving into an established area that is already populated with like-minded folks. If we tread gently we could build up around them until we have a superior voting bloc. But we'd have to be careful to avoid the push-back the Free State Wyoming folks faced.

      K

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  17. How about northwestern NH? "Live Free or Die!" We could put the teeth back into that motto!

    David3

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  18. Doesn't NH already have the a Free State Project? Last I heard they still had filled their quotas.

    Nothing against NH or her people, but I am not moving back east. Too many people, and I don't think that's condusive to what we're trying to bring about here. Just my 2cents.
    Miss Violet

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    1. Correction: Last I heard they still HAD NOT filled their quotas.

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  19. Logistics: Cost to market - Don't let this one factor in, folks. From a business perspective the cost per unit is minimal and can be compensated in several ways, most likely: We'd negotiate a tax break with whatever host town/county/state in which we settle as part of our location package for bringing our business to their AO.

    There are many other ways, but it is a non-issue from a business perspective.

    K

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  20. It might behoove us to find an area that already has a strong patriot/survivalist population. Depending on how many people would actually relocate there. What kind of numbers would we be looking at? If were only talking 5-15 people to start we could find a liberty friendly rancher to assist us until we got homes established. I won't be able to buy a house on my own, but I'm a quiet renter. =) Hell, I would even be willing to have a cot in the factory. Full time security/maintenance. The citadel idea sounds grand also. But the bad guys have bombs. There are many websites that offer former missle silos as retreats. We could find one of those in the area of our small town and a dozen or so could live there very comfortably. Usually they come with acreage as well.That might spark the attraction in some of the more prepper minded individuals.

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  21. Kerodin, Based on the people you talk to, how many people do you think would make the move? ( Up front that is, I'm sure as with the redoubt people will migrate as they are able.)

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  22. We have to get out of the bunker mentality. Moving into a town and the stigma of being 'those crazy survivalist gun guys living in the bunker/silo/fort/castle' will NEVER be acceptable unless we take over the entire town at once. (and I'm all for that) And unless we stumble onto/into an empty and completely stocked factory/town with everything we'll ever need in unlimited quantity, we ARE going to need to deal with the public until we ARE the public.

    We ARE going to need the support of the locals, until WE become the locals. From the post office, to the gas stations, to the grocery stores, from hospitals/medical to the funeral homes. Until we take them all over (years/decades) we will require their services until we either come up with our own, or purchase and take over theirs.

    As with the Liberty Congress, imagine 300 of us moving into a town of 1500. All 300 of us need housing, and it won't take long for the existing vacant homes to be occupied. We will have to build. A local builder (or one of our own, pre-placed and fully 'permitted' in the local codes and legalities gets our business. If we have an 'in' with the permitting and code compliance offices, outside contractors can be brought in for additional building capabilities and capacities.

    If we started Jan 1 with 300 folks, by the end of the year we could have 300 homes with 300 families....fully 1/6th of the population of said town voting ourselves towards a peaceful liberty. Only thing stopping me right now is a job. If I find a job in a freedom friendly state (and I look daily for something in my fields) starting over isn't all that big a deal to me right now.

    I DO know of a guy with a hell of a business proposal for a ballistically superior housing solution...for a great price and solid, quality investment. For those still looking for the bunker to live in ;-) Concrete shot monolithic domes. Some of his work is here: http://www.ar15.com/archive/topic.html?b=10&f=17&t=497528 with more information here: http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_10_17/625006_.html. The guy knows his shiite.

    But, bottom line, unless we own the town to start with, we are going to have to deal with the locals (and our stigma) until we either force everyone to 'come over to the dark side' or push them out and replace them with 'us'. Unless someone has a better way of doing it that includes using existing infrastructure and personnel in our best interest, we will have to maintain relationships with the locals....and that won't be easy being the 'gun nuts in the old missile silo..."I hear they kidnapped so and so last week...yup, that's why the Jones up and moved. I'm thinking of moving as well, those guys just scare me"

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    1. Excellent points millerized. I wonder if we would even have 300 within a year. Hopefully.
      ( but it WOULD be sweet to live in a silo, ala dr. strangelove =) ) I guess i can pretend to be normal for awhile.

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    2. Thinking about what you said Millerized and this is my two cents.


      I think one thing we have to be aware of is that no one wants others to "invade" their town. Living in the West, I have seen that attitude brought in by Califs and Easterners. It does not sit well with Western people. Take roundabouts. The Califs brought the idea. When the Califs came they immediatley set about obtaining every public office they could get into and consequetly CDA has roundabouts. The locals HATE them. Not because they are an ineffcient traffic tool, but because they are a concrete reminder of the Calif invasion that has raised taxes and driven locals out of the area because they can't afford to live there anymore. If our Pioneer effort is going to succeed we are going to have to get in right the first
      time.

      I am not a Mormon, but my husband's family is and I have been exposed to their way of life for several years. The Mormons were persecuted for several years before they decided to just go make a place for themselves, which they did. Now they have a whole state. I think we could learn from their game plan. Just sayin'.
      Miss Violet

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  23. Wisdom Miss Violet, you have it. If we respect them perhaps they will unite with us and make our goals their own.

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  24. This idea may have more appeal than you realize. I have briefly described the Pioneer Project to several friends and the response has been some variation of "When you go, take me with you." There are ordinary Americans out there who are longing for a place like this but don't think it exists or can exist any more. The idea of an "old fashioned" community resonates strongly with good people.

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  25. Homesteading with patriots and preppers. Building a community based on the moral and constitutional ideology that our nation was founded on. Comes close to the feeling the first freedom seekers must have felt when their feet touched ground.

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  26. Something similar to this?

    http://www.landsofidaho.com/land-for-sale/586-acres-in-Caribou-County-Idaho/id/260649

    600 acres.
    Less than a mile from the 1200 acre alexander reservoir.
    Less than 5 minutes from a city with an airport.
    Caribou county Id has a population of 7000

    Also, In April the chamber of commerce from Potlatch, Idaho posted an article about their desire to build a firearms manufacturing community to replace the lost commerce of a closed mill operation.

    I can do better research, just want to be sure what were looking for.

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  27. Why not Kentucky? Nice big rivers, lots of coal, some oil, defensible mountains, the east part is far enough away from the New Madrid, and Liberty-friendly politicians (Rand Paul).

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  28. Buy land with running water and a slope. If you get enough "fall" you can set up your won hydro-electric power plant. They do make small ones you know. I think I saw an article about it in Mother Earth News years ago. Also an article about a closed loop farm that produces it's own methane. Corn to alcohol...alcohol for engines etc. Mash waste to feed pigs. Pig shit to methane digester for more fuel. Waste from that to fertilize the corn.

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    1. Yup - John Robb - his Global Guerillas site, and his Resilient Communities idea. The ideas and the tech for self sufficiency is coming together.

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  29. When were talking about building the condos on location I envision each house being self sufficient power wise. Metal roofs that make rain gathering easy, facing solar south with with panels on one full slope. Water is gathered into 2,500 gallon tanks under each condo. A great example to look to would be Cody Lundins' house. Very self-sufficient.

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    1. Also GOOGLE earthships for more ideas on passive energy stuff.

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  30. This is a mukti-million dollar project, and though I do not know the financial situation of the planner,it seems improbable that this can sustain the legs it needs to moge forward. For me moving to a remote part of Idaho would mean giving up my stream of income to help support said venture. Furthermore, moving to remote area means that jobs wont be as abundant. The business idea is interesting, but the economy sucks and the good will of fellow patriots to buy enough product to fuel a businesss that will cetainly include the cost of raw materials and other overhead is going to be a very slooow process.

    We have tnkered with a planned survival community and i would say all of this needs to be completed in phases. To get it done, know where you want to go but only focus on the next step in front of you. So, if you dont own the plot of land, then work on locating and finding the right piece of land. Honestly, i'd live in a tent if it meant i was free. Once land is done, move to providing essentials to the property, like off-grid water, power, and sanitation. My point is going from nothing to walled fortress is impossible, because supporters will expect the fortress when you're still thinking about where to build.

    For paying for all this, id make this suggestion. Money is tight for a lot of folks who may want to pay for a place for the family there. There are companies that will set up payment plans for people who take a %, but pay the entity the money upfront. So instead of me having to throwdown $5000 for a family of 4 all at once, i could pay for it over time. These are low or 0 interest programs. There are even ecommerce programs thst allow you to do this like a subscription. You just dont get all the money at once, but theres no credit check or interest to pay.

    The last thing i will say and this may be your first step is establishing a charter. I know for me moving from an American Tyranny to live in a place where some crackpot thinks their the next Stalin would suck. Form a council, have clear bylaws and how COC works. Set in place principles of the real Republic and then guard those with your life.

    Good Luck and God Bless this endeavor.

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    1. Taylor: You are absolutely correct on most points. This is a multi-million dollar endeavor, no firearms company will ever generate enough revenue to build the Citadel from it's profits, and it will take years of phased steps to get there.

      But anything is possible if we break it down into bite-sized pieces.

      So, step 1: Build III Arms Company to get the money juices beginning to flow, and as importantly, to permit the III to become known in the "mainstream". Remember, ours is a political movement, and our means of achieving our political goals must range from business to protests, to laws, to elections, and if we must, the Green.

      Once the 1911 prototypes are finished and proven, we'll be ready to go into production, Phase 2. Even now, as I sit only 45-90 days away from having protoypes in the hands of III Patriots around the country for T&E, I can't say with any certainty where, who, or how "production" will take place.

      Will we have enough public interest that we'll have orders sufficient to set up a full shop with all brand new machines in Idaho on day one, or will we hire 10 custom gunsmiths across the country to build to our specs to satisfy our initial orders, or will we strike a production deal with an established shop that wants to grow with us? I simply can't answer those questions yet because there remain too many unknowns at the moment.

      What we do know: Once we are in production with pistols shipping to customers, we are on the path to our first shop in Idaho. We'll take the business decision of what our next offering will be (AR/AK/M14, et cetera) and get it into production to continue growth.

      What the gun company can do is buy enough land for the Citadel, and the first construction project on that site will be the "Official" III Arms factory. At that point there will not only be jobs for the employees of the III Arms company, but also construction jobs for building the factory, and even limited opportunity for support business opportunities (such as a restaurant, for instance).

      When looking at a planned community model of the scope of the Citadel, one does not write the check personally, nor would III Arms Company take a loan to build the city.

      Instead, some incredibly handsome, rather short red-headed guy with a bad habit of thinking big and then trying to make big things happen, would probably sit down with major companies who would like to have a long term lease inside the walls of the town that will have 2000-3000 households. (A grocer, perhaps Bass Pro and Cabelas would like to compete for a spot, et cetera) Those anchor companies would pay for the right to have access to the customer base, and that money begins the build...

      And there are at least 6 more major revenue streams that will pour operating capital into the building fund.

      The underground facilities, the residential sections, the commercial and retail sections, and finally the wall, can all be physically built within 30 months, if the money was sitting in a bank account. But, as you've rightly noted, we'll more likely have to go in phases, especially in the early days.

      My personal goal is to have construction complete, including the wall (which will probably be the final build) in 5 years. That is probably more aggressive than is realistic, I think 7 years is closer.

      But we'll have III Pioneers living on-site as soon as they are ready to make the move once we've purchased the property for the Citadel.

      And in the end we will have a thriving town safely within the walls of the first genuine Citadel built in generations, and not a Liberal among us. ;)

      Of course, as I have said elsewhere, there are a thousand ways we can fail, and only a few paths lead to success.

      Thank you for the support, and the opportunity for me to flesh it out more than I have elsewhere.

      K

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    2. A factor that appears here that doesn't in other similar projects is volunteerism. There are some people (retired military, retired business owners, for instance) who could show up and start building without the need for any income from the project. There have already been comments here to the effect of "tell me where and when and I will show up and start working" that demonstrate this willingness.

      I should be able to retire next year some time and would be quite willing to move to the Citadel location, live in a camper or trailer and start building. If I was able to learn to fly a KC-135, I'm sure I could learn to run a back hoe or bulldozer or front loader. There are things like the compressed earth block maker from the Global Village Construction Set that, once built, make quality construction material for just the cost of fuel to run the machine.

      Once an initial factory building and even just a simple barracks type structure were built more people would be able to show up. I think even 5-10 initial volunteers could move the timetable up appreciably.

      Working out a social/political structure is important, but a group of people who subscribe to the Jeffersonian definition of Rightful Liberty should be able to create something functional and effective.

      Delete
  31. Interesting article over at Bonnie Gadsden's place.

    http://bonniegadsden.blogspot.com/2012/08/contour-crafting-automated-construction.html

    3D printing of buildings. Have to do some more research on the current state of the art, but for a large project like the Citadel, the initial capital costs could be hugely offset by the reduction in total cost to build the entire city. This might be the ticket to making the Citadel happen quickly and inexpensively.

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  32. I have been reading through alot of your doctrine and have just one question. Will the society of the III Percent Patriots pay their due taxes to our Federal Government?

    -A Marine Sergeant

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    1. Always interesting to see how people phrase their questions. Says a great deal about their frame of reference and preconceived notions. Notice the terms "doctrine", "society", "due taxes" and the signature "A Marine Sergeant".

      Sergeant, we don't have a "doctrine" other than Liberty. Your frame of reference is a rigid, hierarchical structure with top down authority and control so you apparently assume that applies to us also. It doesn't. We are a group of individuals who are choosing to associate voluntarily and work toward a common goal. The term "society" also implies a level of homogeneity and conformity that probably doesn't apply either.

      And "due taxes" opens a can of worms that is pretty much infinitely large. There are educated, thoughtful individuals who make a very good case that taxes are theft, the government putting a gun to our heads and saying "pay up, or else". Your signature line suggests you have a vested interest in money being forcibly removed from our pockets to be placed in yours. Forgive me if I have made a false assumption, but your question appears at first glance to be entirely based on pure selfish self interest, not on what is the "right" thing to do. None of this is actually relevant to my answer to your question, however.

      We are, as a matter of fact, having a discussion along these lines on another posting. My own personal opinion is that we should pay our taxes, obey the laws and be "good citizens" but only as a matter of practicality. Drawing negative attention to ourselves from government would only interfere with our ultimate goal of building our community in the Citadel.

      The current system is unstable and fragile, socially, politically and financially. Some form of collapse seems inevitable at this point. If and when a major collapse happens, your question would no longer need an answer because there would no longer be a Federal Government to pay taxes to. I'm 55 and don't expect things to hold together long enough to collect any Social Security. I could be wrong, but I prefer to be overly cautious and wrong than overly optimistic and wrong. If I were you, I would consider having an alternate plan in case "retire and live off of my government pension" doesn't end up being a viable long term option.

      VJ

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  33. I see Predator drones firing nukes and wiping you off the face of the map. Do you really think that if things go as they seem to be, the government will let you be? Does Ruby Ridge ring a bell? Nice idea, but totally impractical IMHO.

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    1. Anon: Really? You see FedGov dropping tactical nukes on Citizens?

      If that happens, it won't matter much where one lives, now will it?

      K

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    2. These guys give me a little chuckle every day. Thanks for that Anon.

      I know it may be difficult, but do try to think further than the simplest of thought processes.

      BG

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  34. Just a medical retired electrical/instrument senior designer offering my skills to the project. I want to be part of Citadel, all of it.
    Papa Mike
    III

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    1. Sign the interest list at iiicitadel.com and join in. We have a forum starting up soon where we can discuss all of our plans and ideas.

      VJ

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  35. So many skills offered with properly placed intensity because time is indeed short. I'm closing in on my 60th year very soon and I've been blessed despite myself. What place, if any, would a pastor have in the "Plan"? FYI - my wife and I both have and exercise our ccw's and we also have basic rifleman training. Mine was learned in the USMC. We have been prepping for over 2 years and are still at it. We have 6 months easily covered.

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    1. I myself am not a Christian, though many here probably are. Most likely a pastor who believes in rightful liberty will be welcome with open arms.

      RedWulf

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  36. I am in Idaho now. About as ready as I'll ever be, but still making trips into the city for more ammo. Never enough. Winters can be brutal. Summers are short. Hunting and fishing are great where I am, but its too high for much agriculture. I havent gone so far as to build a greenhouse, but for the first year or two I shouldnt have to worry.

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  37. A pastor is always welcome in my neck of the woods. A Marine Pastor? When can ya start?

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  38. Howdy y'all,

    I'm a relative new-comer to the whole liberty movement, and the three-percent movement in general. I'm glad to see something along these lines steadily materializing, and to see it appear at such a crucial time. It was over the past few months that I had made a point of reading quite heavily into current events, jumping from places like The Agitator and its like and eventually ending up regularly reading WRSA and its blog-kin. I must say, current events have me damn nervous.

    For a while I had been telling myself that it was a foregone conclusion that if raids ever came to my neck of the woods then I would start off shooting and leave in a body bag. Fatalist, yes, but I have been no stranger to fatalism the past few years. But with this I see a far better alternative, and a far greater likelihood of survival.

    I had been re-reading my copy of 'Heart of Darkness' and came upon a verse that resonated quite strongly with my current mindset. "...it was written I should be loyal to the nightmare of my choice." My friends and family feel that I am far to pessimistic about the prospects of honest individuals in this nation and feel that I am grossly over-reacting. I now know that what they feel is completely irrelevant to what I feel. I have chosen my nightmare, and the nightmare is the coming to pass of an honest mans worst fears: social upheaval, rioting, complete erosion of civil liberties, violence and bloodshed within his own state, and so forth. This looming threat is real to me, regardless of what others think, and I have chosen to respond to it accordingly. Make no mistake, it is a walking nightmare that slowly encroaches upon this land, and I stay up late at night thinking what may come in the future. We see already the writing on the walls that something will be happening in the future. I wish only to be prepared to meet whatever that something is and hopefully survive.

    So I suppose my question is this: Do you have any room for a young green-thumb with a knack for writing and a love of history? I am no stranger to manual labor, although I do not claim to be a paragon of physical prowess. I enjoy gardening very much, and had a wildly abundant yield of tomatoes, peppers and cucumbers out of a small patch in my backyard this past summer. I know a thing or two about plants, as I've been fortunate enough to have a job at a local plant nursery for nearly the past decade. My college career had a heavy emphasis on history, classics and a bit of theology with some philosophy interspersed. I treat our constitutional freedoms with the utmost gravity, and while I admit that I place great emphasis on personal armament, I value freedom of speech and the right to privacy in all aspects of ones life.

    I hope this project really takes off. I've been hesitant in the past to make a move from my state of Maine, but I feel that things are only to become far more grave from here on out, and that it would be better to work in a community of like minded individual than attempt to be a lone rifleman and try to rally my friends to the cause when the situation has already become to dire. Cold weather won't be a problem for me, although humid weather tends to hit me like a sack of potatoes if it comes down hard. But I've managed before, and I'll do so again, especially considering that lives may depend on it.

    I have enough money saved up to make the trek, and perhaps pay for rent upon arrival (or so I hope, at least if gas prices don't go the way of gold). I have my rifles and reloading equipment. I have many volumes on Greek/Roman and medieval history, as well as current treatises and studies on Counter-Insurgency and previous recent wars. As to what use those would serve, who knows, but there might be a diagram or two of a citadel among them.

    I look forward to this project becoming a material reality. I eagerly await the muster call. If y'all would have me, I'd be honored to help in whatever way I could.

    Thank you for your time,

    Non-Cataphract

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    1. Experienced gardeners are going to be a significant asset. Food, water and energy self sufficiency are vital to the long term success of the project. People who have never tried gardening don't realize the amount of knowledge and experience it takes to get a good garden going. I know because I pretty much suck at gardening. Have to work on that.

      You sound like someone who would fit in. Growing food and building things are going to be prime tasks for quite a while. Have you signed up on the interest list at iiicitadel.com? If not, go do it.

      VJ

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